Peak Moment - Locally Reliant Living for Challenging Times

Knowing and Using Our Gifts

“Each of us was born to do something unique on this planet, and to give our gifts. That all comes from heart and soul and spirit. Without those in [our] work, we cannot really feel satisfied or fulfilled or truly rewarded…” Ellen Hayakawa, author of The Inspired Organization — Spirituality and Energy at Work, delineates four pillars to help us find our unique gifts. Values are what are important to you. Your Life Purpose is with you throughout your life, regardless of how it might be expressed. Visions and Missions can change over time, and may involve working with other people on a shared mission.

Food, Community and Our Place on Earth

If the trucks stopped rolling, how long could locally-produced food sustain your community? A farmer friend of Whidbey Islander (WA) Vicki Robin calculated “Two weeks in August [peak harvest time].” Vicki went on a one-year 10-mile diet, building relationships with her neighboring producers of meat, milk, eggs, and produce. This led her to learn about large-scale food systems which have largely replaced the local food economy.

Dying Consciously in a Loving Community

After a terminal diagnosis, Steve Hamm asked a circle of friends to be with him in his dying. With guidance and support from end-of-life caregiver Kippi Waters, Judy Alexander and other friends were deeply changed as a result.

Connecting with Ourselves, Each Other, and Earth — Personal Tools for These Times

“If we’re going to really be present in this predicament, we’re going to have to befriend all of our emotions. So we teach some tools for how to do that. Being present with your body. How does the body fit in with all of this? Then, we teach some tools for how do we really see each other?” Carolyn Baker and Dean Spillane-Walker continue with specific tools and practices they’re offering as part of “Living Resilience.”

Peak Moment - Connecting with Ourselves Each other and Earth - Personal Tools for These Times

“Every single metric [of abrupt climate change] has been accelerating since I took on writing the book [The Impossible Conversation] in 2014,” says Dean Spillane-Walker. “But … the calling of our times, is: who will be together in the face of these predicaments?” Dean and Carolyn Baker are offering “Living Resilience,” an online body of resources, workshops and a supportive space for sharing inspiration, learning, and community. They support participants to reconnect with their deeper wisdom, with one another, and with the Earth in the context of the unfolding global environmental and economic crises. As Carolyn says, “…so we can build resilience. Not so we can build survivalists, and store lots of beans and bullets… so we can be truly resilient physically, emotionally, spiritually, and in every way as we navigate this unprecedented experience that humanity has not had to face before.” Episode 331. [carolynbaker.net, livingresilience.net]

Deep Nutrition — Eating the Way We Used to Eat

“Nature knows Best,” says Cate Shanahan, M.D. “Just do what people used to do….” For their book Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food, she and her partner Luke researched early American cookbooks and worldwide cultures with intact cuisines.

Share-It Square: Creating Neighborhood Gathering Spaces

Every year for the past two decades, the neighbors near Sherrett Street in southwest Portland repaint their colorful street intersection. Resident Mighk Simpson gives us a tour on painting day. On the sidewalk corners are spacious cob benches (with roofs), a children’s playhouse woven from tree branches and found materials, a beehive-shaped dispensary for the monthly neighborhood newsletter The Bee, a 24/7 Tea Station, and the first-ever “Little Free Library”, an innovation which has now gone viral around the world.

The Open Source Seed Initiative — Protecting Our Food Commons

Plant breeder Carol Deppe is passionate about making seeds available for all growers, rather than being in the control of a handful of corporations. “If we want to control the kind of food available and the kind of agricultural system that we want, we have to do our own breeding,” she explains. “What Open Source Seed Initiative (OSSI) does is create a pool, a protected commons, of germ plasm which will always be available for breeding.

Living Abundantly in the Sharing Economy: A Voice of Experience

“I ask the groups that hire me to pay me what feels good and right and fair to them, an amount they can afford, and that they can give joyfully… I basically trust them.